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Full text of "Hitch your wagon to a star."

6~£9-/0 




yiitcK you r wagon 

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PREFATORY. 



THE PARTICULAR STAR that we would direct the 
reader to is a protective agent for Iron and Steel 
structures from the ravages of Rust and Corrosion. 
The problem of protecting important Steel structures is by no 
means solved, and an increasingly widening field is open for 
further experiment and research. 

The subject of the protection of Iron and Steel, and the 
manufacture of successful protective paint, demands more chem- 
ical knowledge and technical detail than can be given by the 
average paint manufacturer; it is, in fact, a complete specialty. 

We are great believers of 4i a small farm well tilled," and 
have for years given our sole attention to this work, digging 
deeply into the causes and effects of corrosive action of gases, 
atmospheric influences, the effects of sudden changes of tem- 
perature and other influences arising from natural and manu- 
facturing sources. 

In our product, Carbonizing Coating, we have a protect- 
ive paint that will withstand to a greater degree the vicissi- 
tudes of actual service under all classes of conditions than will 
Red Lead, Graphite or structural paints generally. We do 
not base our guarantee on theoretical calculations, but on 
actual practice ; time has verified all our claims for Carboniz- 
ing Coating, 

Progressive Engineers, Architects and large paint con- 
sumers are reaching out for something better, something more 
reliable; something, that while it may not solve complcteK the 
great problem of protecting Iron and Steel from rust and de- 
cay, will at least give longer protection (at no greater cost) 
than is afforded by Red Lead, Graphite, Oxide of Iron and 
other paints of a similar character; to them we invite the 
careful perusal of the following pages, and to carefully note 
the universally satisfactory re-ults in preserving Iron and Steel 
with Carbonizing Coating. 

Carbonizing Coating is made only h\ 

The Goheen Manufacturii i mpany, 

Expori Office: Canton, Ohio, I S \ 

IS Rilliter Street, London, E. C, England. 

Correspondence invited in all languages. 



T 







4 



Si'!!! 




l—Vontiac 'Building. 

2 Champlain Building. 
3—MonadnocX Tiloc%. 
4 Masonic t>emple. 

Group of modern buildings, upon which Carbonizing Coating was used 
to protect the exposed Iron and Steel work from Rust and Corrosion. 



LINSEED OIL. 



TN PAINT MAKING there is no substitute for Linseed Oil; it has been sometimes 
alluded to as "the life" of paint, but in reality it is that portion that first becomes 
disintegrated and decays. 

Linseed Oil alone is no protection for metal surfaces; it dries with a porous film, 
absorbing moisture, admitting of oxidization. But chemically pure prepared Linseed Oil, com- 
bined with proper pigments, gives the most lasting and efficient paint covering made for 
Iron and Steel construction. 

There is only one oil known that ranks higher in the art of paint making than 
Linseed Oil, viz, Japanese, or, as it is sometimes called, Tung Oil, which when dry is abso- 
lutely waterproof and weatherproof. To this oil the Japanese and Chinese owe much of 
their success in Lacquer, Varnish and Paint making, which they have carried on for ages. 
The cost and small production of this oil, however, precludes it as a paint vehicle in this 
country. 

Oil entering into a protective coating must be absolutely pure, pressed from ripe seed 
and from flax which is cultivated for the seed and not for the fiber. Unfortunately, the 
most of the flax raised in this country is raised for the fiber, and the major portion of 
seed is never allowed to ripen. Oil made from unripe seed is totally unfit for use in suc- 
cessful protective coating for Iron and Steel construction. The seed should be at least six 
months old before pressing, and the oil "aged" and "settled." Oil pressed from unripe 
seed or flax which is raised entirely for the fiber, yields on an average about ten per cent 
of water. It is from this character of flax that the bulk of our "Commercially Pure 
Linseed Oil" is pressed. 

It will be seen, therefore, that the ordinary Pure Linseed Oil of commerce is not 
adapted to protective paints; the oil of commerce must be treated — freed from water, 
glutinous substances known as muscovites, and other contaminations, before it can be used 
in preservative paint, where reliable and uniform results are expected. 

There are two hundred and ninety-three non-drying oils which are available for adul- 
teration of Linseed Oil, and to which might be added eighty animal and fish oils; these 
unfortunately are frequently mixed with the Pure Linseed Oil of commerce, and experts 
alone can detect their presence. 

It is apparent to what extent these adulterants are used when we stop to consider 

that the world's total supplv of Linseed Oil is so nettling like 250,000,4 gallons, while 

the demand is 400,000,000 gallons. 

Cottonseed Oil. Poppyseed Oil. Rosin Oil, Rapeseed Oil, Col/a and Lucca Oil arc 
h-equentl) used as adulterants of Linseed Oil, and we might remark that the non-uniform 
results obtained from many paints are the results of the presence of these oils, rather than 
the fault of the pigments used. 

In preparing "Carbonizing Coating," wt "hitch our wagon to the high* and 

prepare our <> 1, not trusting commercially pure oil, but working only with a product that 
nically pure, knowing that the paint maker's success m producing an absolutely 
S j„ an j D the purity of the material u 



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CHARtCTTETOWN. P- 



, CAN- F« 



• - 



GENTLEMEN .J ^ that W e h.»< ^P house , 

I dU " ,0 h Coa" J<° is °" e °; cove S £** has rfwfl. 
I ° been attacked by the » P^ rf w as use but ,,, _ 

surprising how uuly yo urs, Engl neer. 
J coats. U , NRV K^LoRO^J^_ _____ 



Mr, Royal Pumping Station, 'Baltimore, Md. 

Henry Braums, Consulting Engineer, "Baltimore. Md. 



tklepi 

6207 cortland i" 



CABLE ADDRESS : 
•'n^TlCER' 1 NEW YORK 
B °C AND L.EBER CODES 



Oliver S- Ticer M 
C^,r ana> Manufacture *** *-■ 

„ ,. , MON»OI TAYLOR BLDC. 

"•" T Mw „12 1901. 

New ^ ork, March .-. 

* n Nn 253 Broadway, City- 

The pipe upon wh.ch have ied under 

ground and n t have had 

unsat.sfactory 1 *° ul but _ am happy 

| complaints from m> clients ^ 
; t o say that 1 have never ut 

of complaint. b h expo rt 

I have used the coatm ; fo ^ 

and domestic us. ^^VTransit, and 
, exceedingly rough handling 
' wit h the results above stated^ 




Pipe Line on Pike's "Peak, Colorado. 

Protected by Carbonizing Coating. 



^ 



PREPARATORY TO PAINTING IT IS ESSENTIAL 
TO DO SOME CLEANING. 



THE PROPER APPLICATION of a preservative paint is a most 
essential feature. Some paints and coatings are flowed on; others 
should be brushed out vigorously to a thin, even coat, and to this 
class belongs "Carbonizing Coating. M 

Cleanliness of the metal before applying a protective coating is abso- 
lutely essential, and is a most important primary factor towards preservation. 
When we say clean, we mean free from moisture, dirt, shop grease, flash 
scale and rust. Shop grease can be removed by repeated applications of 
benzine or lye water and afterwards cleansed with warm water and dried 
with cloths, or by the aid of heat. Rust and flash scale may be removed 
successfully by the sand blast, or with steel brushes and scrapers, and by 
"pickling." Deep-seated rust spots should have heat applied to them, the 
usual method being the use of an ordinary painter's torch; this converts 
the rust into a new body, viz, Peroxide of Iron, which is easily removed 
by simply dusting off from the surface to be painted. 

Too little attention is given to the cleaning of Iron and Steel before 
being coated. It is imperative, to obtain the highest results, that the clean- 
ing should be thorough. Here is a sample of an inspector's report on 
the cleaning of construction work prior to painting: 

"The removal of the rust spots and mill scale was being done by 
putty knives and whisk brooms. Steel brushes were also used (evidently 
a minor appendage to the brooms). If there was anything unusual in 
this method of cleaning at the shops, it was on the side of thorough- 
ness. After cleaning, the plates still showed thin yellow rust spots, and 
these showed plainly, but of a darker color, after the Oil Coating was 
applied. " 

Nothing but imperfect results could be attained from slipshod clean- 
ing as above noted. 

In painting old surfaces, where the paint is badly scaled, all !<• 
paint should be removed either with the sand blast, careful use of steel 
brushes or an application of paint remover, cleansing and drying thor- 
oughly before painting. 

No preservative coating, let it be Red Lead, Oxide of Iron, Graphite 
or any other paint made, will adhere, protect and preserve on a suH 
that i- wet, greasy and rusty at the time of applying the coating. 

Engineers and Architects are paying much more attention to the 
matter of "clean surface before painting" than they have in the p 
and are well repaid by obtaining the maximum protection from the 
various coatings used. 




Colorado Fuel and Iron Company's Plant. 




'Pennsylvania Steel Company's Plant. 



Carbonizing Coating protects Iron and Steel work in the plants shown above. 



THE DURABILITY AND COVERING CAPACITY 
OF VARIOUS PROTECTIVE PAINTS. 

^^00 FREQUENTLY Protective Paints are bought without any 
regard to their real economy, viz, the covering capacity and 
durability. The following table is compiled from actual practice, 
and demonstrates that the first cost does not govern the real economy 
of rustless coatings: 

PAINT TABLE. 





























( ARBONIZING 


ZL 


SPAN 




\KL \ 


< , 


VLLONS PAIN 1 Rl QUIR] D 


lsi 


AND 2nd 


{ OATS] 


COATING 
























- 








[RON 


RED 


WHITl 








CARBON- 


GALLONS PER 


COS! 




















CR IPHI 


iSPHALT 


IZING 


100 LBS. 


PER KM) 


^ 
3 


FEET 






OXIDI 


[ E 


AD 


1 l \l) 








COATING 


OF BRIDGE 


LBS. OF 


'J. 






















BRIDGE, 


f 








1st 


I'M. 


1st 


I'M. 


1-1 


2nd 


Lsi 


I'M) 


1st 


I'M) 


1st 


2nd 


1st 


2nd 


2 COATS 




20 


L800 


400 


1 


1 


i 


ft 


1 


S 


1 


I 


14 


1 


A 


4 


. 1 128 








Hi 


:,-_*< k | 




1* 


H 


u 


I 


u 


Li 


14 


a 


3 


H 


2 


4 


.015 


.010 


0.04 


*• 


60 


L0200 


L400 




o 




4 


3 






2 


5 


Q 


14 


i 


.015 


.010 


0.04 


s5 * 


80 


L6800 


221 N ' 


U 


• > 




2* 


U 


3 


u 


.'! 


7 


44 


2i 


i* 


.013 




0.03 




25000 




6 


H 


u 


3 


6 


H 


6 


H 


10 


6 


."> 




.OIL' 


.008 


0.03 




L20 


34800 




7\ 


5* 


54 


4 


n 


54 


n 


54 


13 


7* 


3| 


24 


.01] 


.007 


0.03 


140 


16200 




11 


3 


8 


54 


ii 


B 


ii 


8 


L8 


11 


54 


34 


.012 


. i N 18 


0.03 


- 




5< y% >« i 


gl ii i« i 


16 


\2 


12 


3 


16 


L2 


Hi 


12 


i j , 


L6 


8 


54 


.013 


,009 


0.03 


L80 


73800 


1 1 it ii h i 


20 


14 


14 


in 


l'ii 


14 


20 


14 


33 


20 


](» 




.013 


.009 




i s 




90000 


1 _* 


24 


17 


17 


L2 


24 


17 


24 


17 


in 


24 


L2 


,s 


.013 




0.03 


t,^ 




L07800 


1 -,« n .. i 


30 


21 


L'l 


L5 


30 


L'l 


30 


21 


50 


30 


15 


ID 


.01 1 


.009 


0.03 


* ^ 


240 


L27200 


1 M II H 1 




25 


26 


L8 


:;i , 


26 


36 


26 


60 


36 


18 


12 


.014 


.009 


0.03 


_', M | 




•j L000 


12 


30 


30 


21 


12 


30 


12 


30 


7n 


4 2 


21 


1 4 


.014 


i N H i 


0.03 




280 


L70800 


24000 


18 


:;", 




24 


4^ 




18 


35 


s(| 


48 


24 


Mi 


.014 


| M 1! | 


().().'{ 




300 


L95000 


_'s| H H 1 


56 


in 


w 






10 


56 


(0 


'.til 


56 


28 


L9 


.01 1 


. i N >' 1 


0.03 



80 


60000 


^800 


10 


L00 




6800 


14 


120 


1 12000 




18 


Mil 


| 54 H M K 1 


! ji N n i 


24 


L60 


185000 


1 ",l II M 1 




180 


221 M m h i 


] v| ,N| | 


: M S 


200 


270000 


•J 1 ti< HI 


13 


22i i 


319000 




51 


240 


375000 


: n N m 1 1 


60 


260 


129000 








190000 




7^ 






14500 


89 



7 7 5 I" - lu 7 1»» 10 5 3 .008 .005 0.02 

L0 L0 7 M lo 14 10 23 M 7 5 .008 .006 0.02 

^ *o L20 112000 13 L3 9 i^ L3 L8 13 29 18 9 6 .008 .005 0.02 

£ !2 Mil L50000 12000 24 17 17 12 24 17 24 17 10 24 12 0.02 

S » L60 185000 L5000 30 21 21 L5 30 21 30 21 50 30 1"» H» .006 .006 0.02 

t*, w | S() 226000 L8080 36 26 26 l v 36 26 36 2 1 36 18 12 .006 .005 0.02 

, *J 200 270000 21600 13 31 31 22 13 31 13 :JI 72 13 22 u .008 005 0.02 

*^, | 220 319000 25520 51 36 36 25 51 36 51 36 85 "»J 25 17 .008 006 0.02 

c rz 240 375000 30000 60 13 13 30 60 (3 <- ( ' 13 t<m 60 90 20 .008 .006 I 

*? o 260 129000 34320 69 19 19 35 69 19 69 19 115 • 23 008 006 0.02 

«xw lonnnn toonn 7fi I 51 ., \;;n 78 39 26 .008 .006 0.02 

30 .<x' s .006 0.02 

<. overing t ipa< it] <<t NOTI tm< m 

| on in Sq ; ... 500 7* m j 700 1000 500 700 500 700 300 500 1<hki |500 

Price p< I 25 85 70 .40 1.50 ' lu "^ I 

Cost pei ii* 11 Square Feet. I" 07 18 13 17 12 M 10 .13 06 .15 I" ii lot finely ground 

I mu- Ktntrucd III 20 1 10 1 OU 1 , 

■ 100 Squ u ( •" 1 "" 1 " 

20 Vean I 0.92 I 68 12 60 

Relative Economic Value <»n JIn j Browi 

Buildings. — "12 pounds iron averages 1 iquare foot lurface i icjuarc fool floor wri 

Add ten per cent, tor corrugations in corrugated iron. 

STEEL RlVhTtD FIFE. — Number of gallons of Carbonizing Coating per lineal foot of 

pipe equals sum of inside and outside diameters in inches multiplied by 0.000262 for first 

and bv 0.000174 for second coat and succeeding coats. Add three for laps. 



"^ 




The Colorado Fuel and Iron Company's Plant. 

Showing the Cupola of One Blast Farnace. 



Blast Furnace Construction can be protected by Carbonizing Coating for a 
longer period than is afforded by ordinary paints. 



RED LEAD AS A PROTECTIVE PAINT 



T AS BEEN LARGELY SPECIFIED on structural iron work, most frequently as a 
first ccar, finishing the work with one or two coats of Oxide of Iron, Graphite 
or other paints. The fact has been practically and chemically demonstrated that 
the use of pigments of high specific gravity 'such as Rt^i Lead* in first coating are 
entirely wrong, and that pigments of low specific gravity are the most satisfactory for 
primary coating of metal. This conclusion has been reached after the most elaborate experi- 
ment and research by SPENRATH, the noted French Technical Chemist, and many other 
equally high authorities on the problem of preservation of iron and steel. 

At the same time, it has developed that many pigments of extremely low specific grav- 
ities are not altogether suited for the first coatings. Red Lead dries too rapidly and hard, 
'at the expense of the oil) becoming brittle, and does not allow for the expansion and 
contraction of the metal; hence cracks appear on the surface, in consequence rusting takes 
place. There is no pigment we know of within the category of rustless coating pigments, 
which has such a marked effect upon the oil or binding material. Red Lead is easily 
attacked by gases generated from decaying vegetable matter and the combustion of coal. 
Sulphurated hydrogen or locomotive smoke rapidly changes the color of Red Lead and 
alters the chemical composition, disintegrating the paint, causing it to crumble; the 
result being no longer a rustless coating upon the surface of the metal. 

Many mixtures of various pigments with Red Lead have been tried to retard the hard 
rapid drying of Red Lead paint, such as "Red Lead and Lampblack," "Red Lead and 
Yellow Ochre," and many others, but have failed to produce the results desired; especially 
is this the case in the use of Ochre with Red Lead, for the simple reason that Yellow 
Ochre contains in its composition moisture, which, while retarding the rapid drying of the 
Red Lead paint and lending more elasticity to it, (the moisture therein contained under 
many cond.t.ons is freed from the Ochre) is most detrimental to the metal covered with 
it; m fact, aidmg the formation of rust and corrosion under the surface of the paint 
upon the metal. 

The specific gravity of a rustless coating has doubtless a great deal to do with the 
durabd-tv of the covering. In many cases we find Engineers specifying Red Lead paint, 
not to weigh less than thirty pounds to the gallon," to be used U p 0n their work 
whde others specify Graphite paint ma de up of two pounds dry Graphite and one gallon 
Linseed Od. the finished paint weighing about nine pounds to the gallon In the first 
instance, the weight of the pigment predominates to such an extent that we would consider 
■t of very httle value as a protective paint, while on the other hand, in the Graphite paint, 
the wetght of the od or b.nd.ng material predominates. A paint for IRON and STFEL must 
be so balanced as to give the desired protection. I„ the CMe , ked ^~ 
remote amount of oil or binding material cannot be used, owing to the high Jravity of 
t he lead, and produce a des.rable coating. Indeed, in most of the cheap paints now off red 
the p.gmen, ,s much greater than the binding material, and just to the extent the pigmem 
predominates over the od, s the life, durability and usefulness of the coating curtai ed. 

The cos, of Red Lead and the difficulty of applying „ as compared 
as efficient and durable paints, is reducing its use dailv is 9 *♦„.,-• i 



^- -^ 




Piney Creek Trestle, Tennessee Central Railway. 




P. & L. fc\ R. R. 'Potter House, Ptttshurg, Pa. 



OXIDE PAINTS 



OXIDE OF IRON has been in use as a pigment in paints and coatings for the protec- 
tion of iron and steel structures for many years, but under many circumstances has 
failed to lend that protection desired. The cheapness of the material and brilliancy 
of the color has tended mere to its use than the durable qualities of the paint ob- 
tained from it. However, " Pure Magnetic " Oxide of Iron, containing ninety-five per cent 
Sesqui-Oxide of Iron, prepared in chemically refined Linseed Oil, gives a most valuable metal 
covering when price is considered. Owing to the crystallization of Oxide of Iron, the first 
object of a good pigment is defeated, namely: it attacks the life of the oil. Oxide of Iron does 
not combine with Linseed Oil at all, the process of drying depending alone on the absorption of 
oxygen by the oil, in which the pigment assists in a purely mechanical way. One writer on the 
subject of Oxide of Iron as a pigment for metal coatings, goes so far as to pronounce Oxide of 
Iron, after the most careful investigation, to be actually dangerous for the purpose of protection 
of structural work. In this we do not altogether coincide, for our experience of twenty years 
teaches us differently. At the same time it is a fact that ninety-five per cent of the Oxide of 
Iron paints are really injurious owing to the contaminations in the native Oxide or adulterations 
used by paint makers. We are safe in saying that two-thirds of the Oxide of Iron paints now 
on the market contain over five per cent of Carbonate of Lime; and it has been clearly dem- 
onstrated that any paint containing over five per cent of Carbonate of Lime is freely attacked 
by sulphur generated by combustion of coal or other causes, and the paint or coating rapidly 
becomes disintegrated. 

It is therefore conclusive that a pigment used in the composition of a rustless coating 
should not contain more than five per cent of Carbonate of Lime. This is a point which is 
almost imperative in the make-up of true protective paint. The bright, clear color of many 
of our Oxide of Iron pigments has doubtless added much to the preference for Oxide of Iron 
as a structural paint, but our experience has been almost invariably that the brighter the color 
the less durable the paint. 

One other noticeable feature of Oxide of Iron is, that the higher the percentage of Sesqui- 
Oxide of Iron contained in the Oxide the slower the paint is in drying. This is one objection 
to Oxide of Iron as a pigment, for we know that the Oxide of Iron must contain a high per- 
centage of Sesqui-Oxule to give protection, and we also know that a good structural paint should 
not contain any Liquid Dryer, Benzine or Turpentine. 

Oxide of Iron paints give very short protection to iron or steel in the presence of sea 
water. The salts contained therein have a most pronounced effect upon the pigment, in many 
cases and under certain circumstances tending to make the metal more susceptible to rust. This 
fact is clearly demonstrated to the skeptical in the holds of many steel vessels where the paint 
is exposed to a confined atmosphere, and the chemical changes of bilgewater in the lower 
section of the hold, combined with more or less drainage from the ash boxes of the furnaces 
and coal bunkers in steam vessels, (not to speak of the leakage from various cargoes) often emit 
gases which are prone to kill the life of ordinary Oxide of Iron paint. And much the same thing 
takes place on our elevated railroads, where locomotive smoke and drainage from the engines 
containing sulphur, etc., are washed by rain over the surface painted with ordinary Oxide of 
Iron paint; the life of which, when under those circumstances. Sort. 




I 



^m 



GRAPHITE PAINTS. 



GRAPHITE AS A PIGMENT has come into use within recent 
years quite extensively as a protecting pigment for iron and steel 
from rust. The results obtained from Graphite paints have been 
anything but uniform. The various brands of Graphite give entirely dif- 
ferent results. It is claimed that the deposit of Graphite recently dis- 
covered in a section <of Canada is the best, while those mining Graphite in 
Mexico, Ceylon and various sections of the United States, each and all 
claim superiority over one another; therefore we do not wonder at the 
varying results obtained, as the pigment, according to the miners, varies so 
much in quality. The ideas advanced by some that Graphite, when in 
conjunction with Linseed Oil, so arranges itself on the surface of the metal 
like so many shingles on the roof of a house or the scales upon a fish, is 
so ridiculous that we hardly think it necessary to prove scientifically the 
absurdity of the idea. Graphite has never been found in a perfect state of 
purity, and could not in its pure state be used as a protective paint. While 
the pigment Graphite itself is not attacked by acids, alkalies or brine, the 
oil in the paint is, consequently, a disintegration of the coating when ex- 
posed to the action of sulphur, etc. 

It is well to remember that whatever pigment is used in a protective 
coating, let it be Graphite, Red Lead, or any other ordinary paint pig- 
ment, that each and every molecule of the pigment is surrounded by the 
oil or binding medium and {the pigment) does not come in contact with 
the metal at all. 

One of the most objectionable features of Graphite paint is that it dries 
too soft and spongy. Especially is this objectionable when used on railroad 
bridges, depots, etc., where the surface coated is exposed to flying particles 
from fast running locomotives and sand blasts, which puncture the paint and 
la) the surface bare to deleterious agents. Many claim Graphite paint to 
be much more elastic than any other paint. That may be so, but as there 
is a limit to the brittleness of a coating, so there must be to the elasticity, 
hvamine under a microscope Graphite paint mixed with Linseed Oil and 
it will divulge many of the objectionable features of this paint. 

Graphite has positively no affinity for Linseed Oil, therefore the many 
claims made tor it are made for the pigment Graphite, and not for the 
mixture of Graphite and Linseed Oil, known as Graphite paint. The asser- 
tion also, that Graphite remains elastic to the last is m our mind erroneous; 
and to this we say, we have made thousands of gallons 1 Graphite paint' 
but when exposed s lt ie by side with other paints to the ravs of the sun, it 
loses as great a percentage of its elasticity as any other structural iron paint. 
Graphite paints frequently show an unbroken coating on the metal, but, 
lacking in moisture-repelling qualities, underneath the him of paint rust 
and corrosion have been going on jusfl the same. 





Milwaukee Gas Light Co. 's Plant, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Allegheny Gas Plant, Allegheny, Va. 




People's Gas and Electric Ca.'s Plant, Peoria, Illinois. 

Carbonizing Coating does successfully protect the Iron and Steel work 

of Gas Producing Plants. 



CARBONIZING COATING. 



CARBONIZING COATING can hardly be classed with paints; it is 
something more. It has given protection where ordinary good 
paint has completely failed. Why? Because it is made of chem- 
ically pure materials, and manipulated in such a manner that uniform 
and reliable results are obtained. The vehicle is chemically pure Linseed 
Oil, with which are combined time-tried staple pigments; the combina- 
tion cannot be other than durable. 

Carbonizing Coating is made for one purpose only, viz, the pro- 
tection of Iron and Steel from Rust and Corrosion. It is adhesive, and 
completely seals the metal from moisture and other oxidizing influences. 
It is not a new " patented" product, but one that has been in use for 
years, demonstrating its value as a protective paint. 

We invite your attention to the endorsements contained in this 
pamphlet, and the universal satisfaction it has given on all characters 
of work. 

Carbonizing Coating is the quintessence of economical protection; it 
costs no more than ordinary good paint per square foot covered, and 
affords protection to Iron and Steel which is more reliable, and more 
durable, than afforded by ordinary paints; such as Graphite, Red Lead, 
Iron Oxide or mixtures of the same. 




A mill building in course of erection, upon which 
Carbonizing Coating was used. 



T 



University of Notre 7)ame. 

No i k e Dami . End., March 3, 1900 

The Goheen Mfg. Co., Canton, Ohio. 

GENTLEMEN: — In reply to your favor of the 1st inst., I would state 
that Carbonizing Coating has given me entire satisfaction. I have used it 
on roofs that had been painted before with mineral paint, and only applied 
one coat, as I did not consider it necessary to give it two coats. It is the 
best paint for the purpose I have used in the last thirty-five years. I shall 
send for more as soon as work can be done outside, and shall do away 
with all other mineral paints, as they are too expensive to use. 
Yours truly, 

Hrd. Frederick. 



A. ,. r|/] 

M *• WAi DO C E 

****** Valley Bridge and Iron iu , 



-"•* Tullock, Proprietor, 



ALBZ&t Ruhr, / A G«NTfl 



"• DEEP f °-°*t, * s . l Et w * te » rA« KS AN0 BuiloinqS| 
The Goheen Mfg. Co „ Canton 0„- LBAVENWORT «. K,s„ Oct r „ 

Wrv tr «I) yours, 



A. J. T 



I LJ 



OCK. J' 



'Pnetor 



Union Club. 

viciuku B ( , .Un IS, 18M 
7" /it GoAMfl Mff to , Canton, Ohio. 

DEAR Sik ; —I have submitted a sample of your " Carbonizing Coating" 
to the- Government analyst for t he purpose of testing with various acids, etc., 

and he informs me a-* follows, \i/ 

1. Strong Ammonia has practically no effect. 

2. I ia is destructive to the ( Dating 
Strong Nitric Arid has but little effect. 

A. Strong Hydrochloric Acid does not affect the paint except when 
there is a riaw. when it spreads beneath and the Coating easily 

rubs off. 
."). Concentrated Sulphuric Arid attacks the Coat | 
Sulphuric Arid or Sulphur Fumes have no efl 

7 Fuming Nitrk Acid practically the same as Hydrochloric. 

The liquid a.ids. all very Strong, were placed on the plate and after 
14 da\ s were w ashed oH. 

I am now subjecting; a sample von were good enough to send me, to the 
action of sea water. I am, diar sirs. 

ra faithfully, 

Imju UD Mo I 1 




Bridge at Mi. Washington, Jtid. 



Union 'I ruction Co. '$ Bridge , 
ne ar "Baltimore . ffld. 




J. B. fdarsh, Engineer, 

Dt signs, Plans and Sp<\ ifications 
\ietal Structures and Foundations- 



A 
///r Goheen Mfu. ( <>., Canton, ohm. 

I)i S Yours "i the L5th inst., noted. Will 

-.i\ tli.ii have specified you\ ( arbonizing Coating' 1 
on two bi • able impoi tan< e thai I 

gned t i rid believe if to be an excel 

lent pn >tc< tion against rust on. 

1 lie I*- • tin- i it) ni.i\ not be 

built thii year However, there will be considerable 
p. imt used on itructurei now standing. Kindl) -end 
iomc iam| 

un trul) . 

1 B Marsh 




Locomotive Coal and Ashes ^Station, Erie Railroad, Tort JerVis, N. Y. 




Pittsburg & La%e Erie T^aitroad Depot, "Pittsburg, Pa. 

Carbonizing Coating has proved its efficiency on Railroad work, 
Protecting Iron and Steel from Rust and Corrosion. 






ACIDS, SULPHUR AND GASES SHORTEN THE 
USEFULNESS OF PROTECTIVE PAINTS. 

ORDINARY structural paints are readily disintegrated by sulphur 
fumes arising from the combustion of coal in railroad, smelting 
and manufacturing operations. "Carbonizing Coating" has been 
particularly successful in preserving Iron and Steel in the presence of 
acids, gases and other detrimental agencies. 



The Pittsburg O^ burg/po ^ ^ ^ 

Since mak «JS to any parties 

Carbonmng^o^^tmly Master Carpenter. 

paint. G. H 



M --^5?^^r 

• G °lien Mf r„ , '" No '"Ht SVB , 

u G£ "-TUA„\ . " , <1 '"" ". OA/o. ' ""-ON, „, "'; ; <*«*«,. 

?r^W.t a ^5>n t o ourbu ,.. "" 



Supt. 



Salem Wire Nait Co. 

tv, r u ™, ^ ^ Salem, Ohio, Nov. 11, 1887. 

The Goheen Mfg. Co., Canton, Ohio. 

Gentlemen.— Replying to your letter of the 10th inst., 
we have found the paint answered the purpose and seems 
to stand the hot copperas solution very well. * * * 
Yours truly, 

Salem Wire Nail Co., 
. H. II. Sharp. 



Floyd DaVis, E. M.> 

kNALYTICAl AND CONSULTINi 



Ph. D. 



T , ,, . Mj , _ „ Des Moines Iowa May! 

The Oohccn Mfg. Co., Canton, Ohio. 

Dear Si hv I have completed a careful series ol experiment* on Carbonizi' 
ing. Graphite paint and Red Lead paint to determine their comparative merit! for use ii 
i steel structural work. M\ n mini d up as fi 

1 rst. Carbonizing Coating has much greater adhesion to iron and steel than cither 
Graphite or Red Lrad paint. 

1. Sudden changes ol temperature caused both the Graphite and R<d Lead 
paint to crack i id show minute spots of separation from I rbonizioe 

•I had no indication ol crackii 
- before it u as heati d 
Third Bi ■ 

j- d the Red Lead paint allowed ■ 
corrode the steel; but the sample painted with Carbonizii 
impen ious to a ati r and other liquids. 

I irth. All three paints seem about eq 

G ating and Graphite pa 

| 

ring for 

- J otfl r . • 




LrAcroRV orrlCE FAOLH . miMM.s«^ 
Cle nCove.L.I..Obc.14.1900. 




Steel Viaduct. 'Buffalo, N. Y. 



Carbonizing Coating protects Iron and Steel from the effects of 
locomotive smoke, steam, gas, etc. 



THE COVERING 



CAPACITY OF CARBONIZING 
COATING. 



w 



E GUARANTEE that with ordinary labor and ordinary brushes, 
one gallon of Carbonizing Coating will cover 1,000 square 



feet of clean 
experience of others: 



metal surface, one coat. The following is the 



The Muskingum Valley Steel Co. 

ZANE SVILLE. OHIO. OCT. - 

Tlu Goheen Mfg. Co. Canton* OHo rf f 

Gentlemen :— We are m • the results 

of the 10th inst. makmg . .nqmo ^ ni .in B Coating, 

ence have been very satisf actor> _ Carbonizing 

1 Our recent order or 750 e ten. ; 

Coating «as specified tera*^ Ws applied a 

ing 750,000 >X *t" in "ion and have 160 

single coat to this entire spec ^^ ^ 

1 gallons of the coat.ng yet .n stock ^ on 

:r P r,:nU%rgel3 u ------- 

Lesti R V' M M k ' ^ e 



National Smelting Co. 

**«» City, s. d„ Fta . .,, ,,„,., 

r*« GoAem **. Co., c«„ IOJtt 0Af - hK - 

«"». wT»\7 N ti^^ ^ r inquiry of lhe JNth 

Carbonizing Coating fl Ped ° ne barre ' of your 

•o great, that, if it is e ' ~ ve ' ™* ^cUy has been 
on hand to last us J '«."£ J "' ^ haVe eno ^h 
are covered with galvan zed i on ^* ° Ur bui,din P 
Pond with you re g gardW cTan 3 "' "^ COrr - 

National Smelting Co. 

( ■ s. j AifESONj 

Assistant Mgr. 



CHAS. L. TUTT, PRESIOIM. 
SPENCER PENS >S1 BEC. TREAS. 



t M MACNEILL, V. PBES. Gr V MANAGES 
J. D. HAWKINS Bl PEKINTEN1 



The Standard Milling and Smelting Co. 

WORKS : COLORADO CITY 

Colorado Springs. Colo., Aprii 2, 1901 
S. E. Darby, Agt., The Goheen Mfg. Co., Mining Exchange BUg., Denver. 

Dear Sir : — Some time ago we promised to give you the 
work performed by The Goheen Manufacturing Company's Car- 
bonizing Coating. We purchased from you in all 1,358 gallons 
and used in painting 1,323 gallons. We painted 3,863 squares 
of corrugated iron, three coats; two on one side and one on the 
other. This gives a covering quality of 876 square feet of iron 
per gallon of paint, which figures 97J per cent of the covering 
capacity guaranteed by the Goheen Manufacturing Company. 
Yours very truly, 
The Standard Milling and Smelting C<>. 

By J. D. HAWKINS, Superintendent. 



Central Lead Co. 

Flat River. Mo., Aug. 19, 1897. 

Messrs. Oarrells & Freeman, 

No. 3 Franklin Bank Btdg., St. Louis, Mo, 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with your, 
request to state my experience with Carbon- 
izing Coating purchased or you, I am glad 
to say that I am highly p'leased with it. 
As regards its covering capacity, I found 
that I was able to put an excellent coat on 
i ft. of new corrugated iron, mak- 
ing the co-^t only ten cents per square. 1 
was able to cover between 300 and 400 
square feet of corrugated iron with red min- 
eral paint costing fifty cents per gallon, 
making at best 12j cents per square. With 
half a gallon of Carbonized Coating I gave 
a good coat to 400 feet of 8-inch spiral riv- 
eted pipe. The covering was continuous, 
and after six months of exposure to the 
moisture and heat of a mining shaft shows 
no sign of rust coming on. 
Your- truly, 

K. I), o. Johnson, Supt. 



Jones »»*«*. 

\Mr Hit \N l«0» 



Limited. 



Pi i i >k' »C 



«^S^S=fia*r^ ,sa£S!Srt 



ing to ljouccm - — .- 

,„,, buildings as^note ^ . ._,„ to j., column ^ ^ ^ fl 



1 above. 1 he -"""32,-ii* «n»». E5»A !*■* also 



The Thompson Mfg. Co. 

CLEVELAND. Ohiu. Stpr. 27, If 
The Goheen Mfg. Co., Can tun, Ohio. 

Gentlemen : — We had occasion to 

use some of your Carbonizing Coat- 
ing during July, 1S97. You stated 
one gallon would cover at least 1,000 
square feet. We painted 
square feet steel roofing and used 19 
gallons of the coating, which would 
average about 1,250 square feet to 
the gallon. Yours truly, 
• SOU Mm. 
B] ( \ J HOMPSOM 




High 'Bridge on Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Taut Railroad. 

Protected bv two coats Carbonizing Coating. 



SATISFACTORY RESULTS ALWAYS OBTAINED 
FROM CARBONIZING COATING. 







The 


Arizona Copper 


Company, 


Limited. 
















Clij roK 


A k 12 . 




1901. 




The 


Goheen 


Mfg. Co 


., Canton^ 


Oh 10. 














Dl \R 


Sirs :- 


-We are 


in receipt of 


your favor 


of the 


7th inst., 


and 


in 


repl 


y thereto woi 




that we do 


not convey 


water 


from our 


mine 1 -, 


but 


w e h 


ave used your 


Carbonizing 


Coating, and in 


every instance 


it 


has 


given 


perfect 


satisfa* tioi 


\ ours 


truly, 


















J A Ml - ( 




















General Manager. 






J1uf on, and " Wr beared to be n ^ rbon «'ng Coatfn 7 " S 
' bo/Jers e ^ Wis * to sa, tha f " 3S *»*. shape and 3 P ^- 



e 0' rru/y, 

Vau -^' Elect 

U ' H ''>- Supt. 



77? e lottfa Go/d Joining and Milling Company. 

< I I CONSOLIDATED MIMv 

Sll VKR r ms. t ,,[., k lDO 

oheen Mfg. Co., CanU r, OAi'o. 

GENTLEMEN :— We ha\e your favor of the 7th in<-t. We have used 
\our "Carbonizing Coating" on wrought iron water and steam pipes, 
both above and below ground, and have found it verv satisfactory 

Yours truly, 

E. P. Watson, 

Acting Manager. 




'Piney Creek Trestle, JVear Rocktoood, &enn. 

Tennessee Central Railroad, 

Erected by The Carnegie Steel Company. 

Protected bj three • oats Carbonizing Coating. 



^ 



1 






r* 



Mr. Chas. P. Kahler, C. £., Baltimore. Md. Baltimore. Md., Jan. 4 1898. 

Dear SiR-In reply to your inquiry regarding my experience with Carbon- 
izin £ Coatine'wll say > that after satisfying myself as to its merits I have 
Ip^fi^ui on considerable^ my work with most gratify ; results, and 
take pleasure in recommending it as a protective coating for iron and steel. 

Yours truly, 

D. B. Banks, Consulting Engineer. 



Mf* Co , Canton, Ohio. 

bv :.K,« t -conwM T: — th c ; paint you 

u , ,hat they « ""£ ; heir ir on —*- 
have furnished the* » * *~ ^ ^ 8teel 
We w ould like to try «h» P ascertain „ lt 
Do . Dock in Havana nord^ ^ 

of Amer.can and M P ^ be proo f 

J have tried. Th,s pa.n must ^ ^ 

against sait « - °<" this paint? and 

i -•« r« To :« <o - — ■ 

•— " S Verv m ,K your, 

KHMEWSH-PESAST CO 



-go ,vh,', e I wa , * ° a,mg ' so ™ «i«*t year, 
C — Ohio. u C r n r f*»- ■» Brown 

, '"g. which was u<i „. ^ ' Carb o"'^ng Coat- 
Sid " a »'y better ,o oay t an S 3nd " — 

has "- ' e „ nl ; on h ; n ye ;; st — *« 

< arbonizing Coating is , hc . 
that can be used on u ( Chea P« Pain. 

■** the metal v ° me ln <*>"*** 

lours truJv, 

( • W. Gordon p n »j 



OFFICE U r 

/\ i. Currie, C. E. 

Townseno, Montana. Dec. 10th, 1900. 
The Goheen Mfg. Co., Canton, Ohio. 

Gentlemen: — The County Commissioners have awarded a Steel Highway Bridge, 300 feet, to a Mr. 
C. E. H. Campbell, of Council Bluffs. Iowa. The specifications called for no particular kind or brand of 
paint. On being asked for an opinion as to quality, he said "I always use Carbonizing Coating " That 
settled it. Yours truly. 

Frank L. Currie, 

County Surveyor. 



> 



I 

I 



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